Can Women be Supplementing Creatine?

Have you heard of creatine? If you are an athlete or pay attention to your endurance levels and muscle mass, you are likely familiar with this word. For others, this term may not be so familiar. We will go into more detail on this, but for now, creatine is mostly found in cells of the muscles and the brain. It is connected to the energy in the cells and simply put it helps with performance and gaining muscle. A question that is often asked is the following: can women be supplementing creatine? Throughout this article, we will learn more about creatine, how it works in the body, and whether women should be taking it.

What is Creatine?

As a nitrogenous organic acid, creatine is in part responsible for supplying the cells of the body with energy. This is particularly true when it comes to cells in the muscles, creatine is their main source of energy. Creatine is made up of three amino acids: L-arginine, glycine, and L-methionine. Scientifically, creatine is shown as the formula CNCH₂CO₂H. It can be found in vertebrates not only in muscle but also brain tissue. These are the two primary locations creatine will be seen in the body. It is responsible for not only forming but also recycling adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is also known as the main source of the cell’s energy.95% of the body’s stores of creatine will be found in the muscles. The muscles can only store so much of it and once this maximum level is reached, the body breaks it down and it is excreted from the body.

For us to better understand creatine, we need to have knowledge of amino acids. They are organic compounds made up of amine and carboxyl functional groups with side chains. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen are the main components of amino acids. These organic compounds combine to create proteins. The building blocks of life are amino acids and proteins. When the body breaks down proteins in digestion, the leftovers are amino acids. The body uses them to create proteins which help the body perform many functions including growing, repairing body tissue, breaking down food, and so much more. The body can also use amino acids as a source of energy.

Types of Creatine

When it comes to supplementing creatine, we first need to look at dosage recommendations. A loading phase is common which increases the storage of creatine rapidly. To take this approach, it is recommended to consume 20 grams (split into 4 servings/day, 5 grams each time) every day for a week. After this loading period, to maintain these levels in your muscles continue taking approximately 3-5 grams per day. You can skip the loading phase if you wish but it will take about a month to get to the maximum storage level.

Next we will look at the various types of creatine. It can be incredibly overwhelming when you begin looking at the supplements available today. There are many ways creatine can be presented when it comes to supplementation.

Creatine ethyl ester – this type of creatine is not as effective as other forms. It does not absorb into the body well so for the most part it is not recommended for use.

Creatine monohydrate – this is the most common form of creatine. Most of the research you will find will be on this type.

Buffered creatine– this type of creatine has been manufactured with alkaline powder. There really are not any advantages to it, studies do not show any added benefits by choosing this type over the more popular monohydrate type.

Creatine hydrochloride (HCl) – this type is believed to be more soluble than others but science says that there has not been enough research on its use in humans to prove to be effective.

Liquid creatine – this type, in comparison to powdered forms, is not as stable. It has been shown that liquid creatine can break down before consuming and therefore isn’t effective.

Creatine magnesium chelate –this type of creatine has magnesium attached to it. Unfortunately, there is really no advantage to consuming this kind of creatine. Studies do not show it to be any more effective.

You can see from this list that the monohydrate type of creatine shows to be the most effective. We hope that this list helps you understand what you’re looking at when shopping for supplements. We will dig into a specific type of monohydrate creatine in a little bit. Before we get to that, let’s look at how creatine works in the body.

How does it work in the body?

The body stores something called phosphocreatine in the muscles. Creatine is converted by the body to be stored and then it is then used as energy. Because of this, in order to boost athletic performance, enhance strength, improve muscle mass and gain muscle, many people take a creatine supplement. Creatine can boost performance in exercise, improve musculoskeletal health, and has benefits for brain health. Research showed strength gains from a program with weight training improved by approximately 10%. Creatine can also give the body a “boost” meaning you can push harder and faster in a short period of time. Think about something like swimming or sprinting where you need to cover a short distance quickly. With the increased energy from creatine, performance levels improve. It is also believed that creatine supplements assist in lessening mental fatigue.

When it comes to improving muscle mass, creatine increases that phosphocreatine that we mentioned before. Because there is more of it stored in your muscles, more ATP can be made and therefore you’ll have more energy to do high intensity or endurance training. Through this process you can gain muscle. How does that work? First, you can increase the workload in training sessions (i.e. time at the gym). Second, the signals between cells improves and muscle repair and growth can improve. Third, muscle mass can go up because muscle breakdown (i.e. protein breakdown) decreases. Fourth, creatine can reduce levels of myostatin. This protein can slow down muscle growth. Having less of it can increase muscle growth. There are several other things that happen in the body with the presence of creatine in relation to muscle mass, but these are the most common results.

As a side note, if you have kidney disease or any conditions that increase kidney problems, you will want to avoid creatine. Be sure to talk to your doctor about your medical history and any medications you are taking if you are considering taking a creatine supplement. You will want to be careful taking creatine if you are consuming nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as Advil, Motrin, etc.) as they can be damaging to the kidneys and creatine will exacerbate the problem. It is also believed that caffeine will make creatine less effective. It is suggested to be mindful of taking creatine when consuming caffeine.

Health Benefits and Side Effects

We’ve touched on the main health benefits of creatine including more energy and improved brain function, but we’ll explore other health benefits a little further here. Creatine helps energy production in the muscles and adds muscle mass through improved muscle growth. It can increase performance in high-intensity workouts and improve endurance. A few things that should be noted are its ability to help with medical conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, and other neurological diseases. It can also fight fatigue and tiredness. Many studies have been done on all of these subjects (and more) and it’s proven that creatine can have a positive effect.

Some potential side effects of creatine include kidney damage, kidney stones, liver damage, bloating and weight gain, muscle cramps, dehydration, and digestive problems. For the most part, these side effects are very minimal for many people. There are minimal if not almost no adverse effects for most people who supplement creatine.As mentioned, people with pre-existing conditions especially those with kidney or liver problems should consult their doctor prior to supplementing. For those who are completely healthy, there are not many side effects noted when taking normal doses.

Sources of Creatine

The body can create creatine endogenously which means it develops from within. This takes place in the liver, pancreas and kidneysif these three amino acids are present: arginine, glycine, and methionine. Creatine can also be consumed as it is found in some foods, particularly meat and seafood.The richest source of creatine is wild game. This includes things like venison, rabbit, wild boar, moose elk, ostrich, wild duck, buffalo, bison, and squab. Free-range meats contain more creatine than those that are commercially processed. Some examples of this are pork tenderloin, lamb chops, chicken breast, turkey breast, Cornish hen, and veal loin. Lastly, wild caught fish provide higher levels of creatine than farm-raised fish. Consuming these foods can increase the levels of creatine in your body.

Because of the effects of creatine on the body, it iscommon for people to take this as a dietary supplement. This is especially true for those looking to improve athletic performance or increase muscle mass. The list that we shared above are all creatine supplements, manufactured to provide the body with the benefits of creatine beyond what the body makes and is obtained through food. When it comes to supplements, just remember that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not always regulate them. Like all things that you put into your body; we recommend that you research all supplements that you’re considering. We want you to receive the full benefits of the supplement, that’s the reason that you’re taking it right? Be careful to not consume artificial ingredients that can come from poor quality sourcing. We always suggest that you consult your doctor, especially if you have any medical conditions. As mentioned above, you’ll want to make sure that any supplements you’re taking do not react with any other medications.

Can Women be Supplementing Creatine?

This is a common question, “can women be supplementing creatine?” Our answer to this is, yes! There is no reason that women cannot supplement creatine. There is false information out there saying that creatine is not meant for women or teenagers or that only professional athletes and body builders should take this supplement. This is not at all true and the International Society of Sports Nutrition believes it’s completely safe. A lot of research has gone into creatine and therefore it has been deemed one of the safest supplements on store shelves and in online stores today.

We suggest that you be careful of sourcing and what kind of creatine that you’re consuming. We recommend that you look at Top Notch Nutrition’s supplement which contains micronized creatine monohydrate. If a product is micronized, it has been processed to increase its solubility in water. This is a huge advantage to you when consuming as it will then be available for the body to put it to work (this means that you’ll be able to absorb it)! The less soluble it is, the harder it will be for your body to make it work how it is supposed to. We believe that micronized creatine monohydrate should be considered a “top notch” option for creatine available today.

Summary of Creatine

In looking at this subject you can see why creatine is important to the body. Being found primarily in the muscles and the brain, it helps the body maintain energy for the cells to function. In answering the question, “can women be supplementing creatine?” you now know that the answer is most definitely yes! If you are an athlete or pay attention to performance and muscle mass, you will find advantages to adding creatine to your routine. If you’re not an “athlete” but do some training in the gym, get regular physical activity or you’re looking to improve muscle mass, you’re not left out. In these cases, creatine just might be the thing for you to try! We bet that you’ll find some major advantages to adding this supplement.

Check out our “Keto Recipe Tips for Beginners” Ultimate Guide.

Can Women be Supplementing Creatine?

Have you heard of creatine? If you are an athlete or pay attention to your endurance levels and muscle mass, you are likely familiar with this word. For others, this term may not be so familiar. We will go into more detail on this, but for now, creatine is mostly found in cells of the muscles and the brain. It is connected to the energy in the cells and simply put it helps with performance and gaining muscle. A question that is often asked is the following: can women be supplementing creatine? Throughout this article, we will learn more about creatine, how it works in the body, and whether women should be taking it.

What is Creatine?

As a nitrogenous organic acid, creatine is in part responsible for supplying the cells of the body with energy. This is particularly true when it comes to cells in the muscles, creatine is their main source of energy. Creatine is made up of three amino acids: L-arginine, glycine, and L-methionine. Scientifically, creatine is shown as the formula CNCH₂CO₂H. It can be found in vertebrates not only in muscle but also brain tissue. These are the two primary locations creatine will be seen in the body. It is responsible for not only forming but also recycling adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is also known as the main source of the cell’s energy.95% of the body’s stores of creatine will be found in the muscles. The muscles can only store so much of it and once this maximum level is reached, the body breaks it down and it is excreted from the body.

For us to better understand creatine, we need to have knowledge of amino acids. They are organic compounds made up of amine and carboxyl functional groups with side chains. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen are the main components of amino acids. These organic compounds combine to create proteins. The building blocks of life are amino acids and proteins. When the body breaks down proteins in digestion, the leftovers are amino acids. The body uses them to create proteins which help the body perform many functions including growing, repairing body tissue, breaking down food, and so much more. The body can also use amino acids as a source of energy.

Types of Creatine

When it comes to supplementing creatine, we first need to look at dosage recommendations. A loading phase is common which increases the storage of creatine rapidly. To take this approach, it is recommended to consume 20 grams (split into 4 servings/day, 5 grams each time) every day for a week. After this loading period, to maintain these levels in your muscles continue taking approximately 3-5 grams per day. You can skip the loading phase if you wish but it will take about a month to get to the maximum storage level.

Next we will look at the various types of creatine. It can be incredibly overwhelming when you begin looking at the supplements available today. There are many ways creatine can be presented when it comes to supplementation.

Creatine ethyl ester – this type of creatine is not as effective as other forms. It does not absorb into the body well so for the most part it is not recommended for use.

Creatine monohydrate – this is the most common form of creatine. Most of the research you will find will be on this type.

Buffered creatine– this type of creatine has been manufactured with alkaline powder. There really are not any advantages to it, studies do not show any added benefits by choosing this type over the more popular monohydrate type.

Creatine hydrochloride (HCl) – this type is believed to be more soluble than others but science says that there has not been enough research on its use in humans to prove to be effective.

Liquid creatine – this type, in comparison to powdered forms, is not as stable. It has been shown that liquid creatine can break down before consuming and therefore isn’t effective.

Creatine magnesium chelate –this type of creatine has magnesium attached to it. Unfortunately, there is really no advantage to consuming this kind of creatine. Studies do not show it to be any more effective.

You can see from this list that the monohydrate type of creatine shows to be the most effective. We hope that this list helps you understand what you’re looking at when shopping for supplements. We will dig into a specific type of monohydrate creatine in a little bit. Before we get to that, let’s look at how creatine works in the body.

How does it work in the body?

The body stores something called phosphocreatine in the muscles. Creatine is converted by the body to be stored and then it is then used as energy. Because of this, in order to boost athletic performance, enhance strength, improve muscle mass and gain muscle, many people take a creatine supplement. Creatine can boost performance in exercise, improve musculoskeletal health, and has benefits for brain health. Research showed strength gains from a program with weight training improved by approximately 10%. Creatine can also give the body a “boost” meaning you can push harder and faster in a short period of time. Think about something like swimming or sprinting where you need to cover a short distance quickly. With the increased energy from creatine, performance levels improve. It is also believed that creatine supplements assist in lessening mental fatigue.

When it comes to improving muscle mass, creatine increases that phosphocreatine that we mentioned before. Because there is more of it stored in your muscles, more ATP can be made and therefore you’ll have more energy to do high intensity or endurance training. Through this process you can gain muscle. How does that work? First, you can increase the workload in training sessions (i.e. time at the gym). Second, the signals between cells improves and muscle repair and growth can improve. Third, muscle mass can go up because muscle breakdown (i.e. protein breakdown) decreases. Fourth, creatine can reduce levels of myostatin. This protein can slow down muscle growth. Having less of it can increase muscle growth. There are several other things that happen in the body with the presence of creatine in relation to muscle mass, but these are the most common results.

As a side note, if you have kidney disease or any conditions that increase kidney problems, you will want to avoid creatine. Be sure to talk to your doctor about your medical history and any medications you are taking if you are considering taking a creatine supplement. You will want to be careful taking creatine if you are consuming nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as Advil, Motrin, etc.) as they can be damaging to the kidneys and creatine will exacerbate the problem. It is also believed that caffeine will make creatine less effective. It is suggested to be mindful of taking creatine when consuming caffeine.

Health Benefits and Side Effects

We’ve touched on the main health benefits of creatine including more energy and improved brain function, but we’ll explore other health benefits a little further here. Creatine helps energy production in the muscles and adds muscle mass through improved muscle growth. It can increase performance in high-intensity workouts and improve endurance. A few things that should be noted are its ability to help with medical conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, and other neurological diseases. It can also fight fatigue and tiredness. Many studies have been done on all of these subjects (and more) and it’s proven that creatine can have a positive effect.

Some potential side effects of creatine include kidney damage, kidney stones, liver damage, bloating and weight gain, muscle cramps, dehydration, and digestive problems. For the most part, these side effects are very minimal for many people. There are minimal if not almost no adverse effects for most people who supplement creatine.As mentioned, people with pre-existing conditions especially those with kidney or liver problems should consult their doctor prior to supplementing. For those who are completely healthy, there are not many side effects noted when taking normal doses.

Sources of Creatine

The body can create creatine endogenously which means it develops from within. This takes place in the liver, pancreas and kidneysif these three amino acids are present: arginine, glycine, and methionine. Creatine can also be consumed as it is found in some foods, particularly meat and seafood.The richest source of creatine is wild game. This includes things like venison, rabbit, wild boar, moose elk, ostrich, wild duck, buffalo, bison, and squab. Free-range meats contain more creatine than those that are commercially processed. Some examples of this are pork tenderloin, lamb chops, chicken breast, turkey breast, Cornish hen, and veal loin. Lastly, wild caught fish provide higher levels of creatine than farm-raised fish. Consuming these foods can increase the levels of creatine in your body.

Because of the effects of creatine on the body, it iscommon for people to take this as a dietary supplement. This is especially true for those looking to improve athletic performance or increase muscle mass. The list that we shared above are all creatine supplements, manufactured to provide the body with the benefits of creatine beyond what the body makes and is obtained through food. When it comes to supplements, just remember that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not always regulate them. Like all things that you put into your body; we recommend that you research all supplements that you’re considering. We want you to receive the full benefits of the supplement, that’s the reason that you’re taking it right? Be careful to not consume artificial ingredients that can come from poor quality sourcing. We always suggest that you consult your doctor, especially if you have any medical conditions. As mentioned above, you’ll want to make sure that any supplements you’re taking do not react with any other medications.

Can Women be Supplementing Creatine?

This is a common question, “can women be supplementing creatine?” Our answer to this is, yes! There is no reason that women cannot supplement creatine. There is false information out there saying that creatine is not meant for women or teenagers or that only professional athletes and body builders should take this supplement. This is not at all true and the International Society of Sports Nutrition believes it’s completely safe. A lot of research has gone into creatine and therefore it has been deemed one of the safest supplements on store shelves and in online stores today.

We suggest that you be careful of sourcing and what kind of creatine that you’re consuming. We recommend that you look at Top Notch Nutrition’s supplement which contains micronized creatine monohydrate. If a product is micronized, it has been processed to increase its solubility in water. This is a huge advantage to you when consuming as it will then be available for the body to put it to work (this means that you’ll be able to absorb it)! The less soluble it is, the harder it will be for your body to make it work how it is supposed to. We believe that micronized creatine monohydrate should be considered a “top notch” option for creatine available today.

Summary of Creatine

In looking at this subject you can see why creatine is important to the body. Being found primarily in the muscles and the brain, it helps the body maintain energy for the cells to function. In answering the question, “can women be supplementing creatine?” you now know that the answer is most definitely yes! If you are an athlete or pay attention to performance and muscle mass, you will find advantages to adding creatine to your routine. If you’re not an “athlete” but do some training in the gym, get regular physical activity or you’re looking to improve muscle mass, you’re not left out. In these cases, creatine just might be the thing for you to try! We bet that you’ll find some major advantages to adding this supplement.

Check out our “Keto Recipe Tips for Beginners” Ultimate Guide.
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2019-07-12T06:14:15-04:00